Monthly Archives:' April 2017

EPA May Scrap Limit on How Much Mercury Coal Plants Can Spew

By: Eric Levitz, Source: New York Magazine, Originally Published: 4.19.17

In 2012, the Environmental Protection Agency passed a rule limiting the amount of heavy metals that coal-fired power plants could spew into the air. The agency’s research suggested that the rule would prevent 11,000 deaths, 4,700 heart attacks, and 130,000 asthma attacks every year. These findings meant that, for every dollar spent on enforcing the new regulation, the public would enjoy up to $9 in avoided medical costs.

But the Obama administration’s coastal elites failed to understand that the forgotten men and women of America’s heartland actually want their children exposed to dangerous levels of mercury — if that’s what it takes to maximize energy companies’ profit margins. And so, many red states stood up for their constituents’ inalienable right to die from preventable asthma attacks, and sued the federal government over the EPA’s rule.

A question of care

By: Kirk Brown, Source: Independent Mail, Originally Published: March 2017

A review of 205 inspection reports, 63 lawsuits and 105 police reports dating to 2011 found that the quality of nursing homes in Anderson, Greenville, Oconee and Pickens counties varies widely. Although nursing homes here have, on average, fewer deficiencies than those around the nation, care is inconsistent, and when quality suffers patients can be put in danger. We found cases where residents were left outside in scorching summer heat, where drugs were left out without supervision and where care workers refused to perform basic duties such as changing adult diapers. We also discovered that the Upstate’s largest nursing home care provider was among those with the most deficiencies. All of these factors can make even more difficult what already are tough questions for those seeking nursing home care for elderly or infirm relatives.

EPA Chief Overrules Own Scientists, Declines to Ban Pesticide Linked to Fetal Damage

By: Eric Levitz, Source: New York Magazine, Originally Published: 3.30.17

In 2015, scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency advised the Obama administration to ban one of the nation’s most popular pesticides, chlorpyrifos, after concluding that the chemical impaired fetal brain and nervous-system development. Specifically, the children of farm workers exposed to heavy doses of the product appeared to suffer aberrantly high rates of learning, memory, and behavioral problems. The chemical had already been banned for indoor use, in 2001, due to similar concerns.

But Dow Chemical, which makes chlorpyrifos, wasn’t convinced. Nor were many farm groups that rely on the pesticide. And they began lobbying the Obama administration to reject the environmentalists’ supposed alarmism.